Theory of the shafts of the Great Pyramid has cracks - part 4

Written by Ralph Ellis on .

So if these small shafts were not pointing at stars, then what were they doing? They were clearly important, as their complex design must have doubled the construction-time for the pyramid, as Rudolf Gantenbrink demonstrated with his detailed engineering designs for the pyramid.

Please see http://www.cheops.org for Rudolf's professional diagrams and detailed explanations for these small shafts. Surprisingly, the answer to the small-shaft conundrum lies in a mathematical challenge that comes straight out of high school. Let me explain.

What do the shafts in the Great Pyramid

The Pi ratio of 7 : 11 is all about lengths, not angles. The angular differences we have used, of 7° and 5.5°, are angular measurements and therefore have nothing to do with the linear measurements that are fundamental to the Pi ratio. So the architect has devised a riddle for us to solve – ‘When is an angle not an angle but a length?’ This may sound like an impossible question to resolve, but the answer lies on every map.

To plot a position on a map we need a latitude and longitude. But when using this plotting technique, it is convenient to have a distance measurement system that is related to the dimensions of the Earth itself. Thus the unit used in nautical navigation is the Nautical mile, which is defined as being 1/21,600th of the circumference of the Earth, or 1/60th of a degree of latitude. As an aside, the length of the Nautical mile is therefore twice the Great Pyramid’s circumference.

The Great Pyramid as a map?

So the answer to our architect’s crafty conundrum lies in the definition of the Nautical mile, for this unit is related to the size of the Earth and it can therefore be measured as an angular measurement, focused on the center of the Earth. One degree of arc at the center of the Earth equals 60 Nautical miles of latitude on the surface of the Earth; and so we have found a very neat and logical occasion when a linear length is defined in terms of angular measurement. It happens every time a navigator plots a position on a map.  So it would seem that our shaft angles are actually coordinates on a map.

What every grand quest needs is an ancient map, with 'X' marks the spot inscribed upon it. Strange as it may seem, it appears that we have exactly that within the Great Pyramid. As is explained in K2, Quest of the Gods, the outline of the Great Pyramid's chambers represents a perfect outline of the continents of the Earth. But of what use is a map of the world, without some coordinates to place upon it? An interesting map requires an 'X' marks the spot marked on it. Well, we now appear to have just that - a set of coordinates to place upon our Great Pyramid map!

Understanding this clever conundrum allows us to plot the Great Pyramid treasure-map, at long last. We have four shaft angles that can be used for this exercise, and therefore four coordinates that can be plotted on a map. These angles are:

  •             King’s Chamber          45°    &  32.5°
  •             Queen’s Chamber       39.5° &  39.5°

And in doing so, something quite remarkable happens. Because the differences between these shaft angles were exactly 7 and 5.5 degrees, as was explained previously, the two points on the world-map are in very specific locations relative to one another. And if the points are joined up, as has been done in the following diagram, the triangle so formed measures precisely 7 x 5.5 degrees of latitude and longitude respectively. If the triangle is doubled up with its obvious symmetric partner, then the resulting triangle drawn on the surface of the Earth becomes 7 x 11 degrees in size – which is exactly the same dimension ratio that was employed in the Great Pyramid itself.

Plotting the Great Pyramid’s shaft angles on a map, gives a triangle with the same ratios as the Great Pyramid itself

Plotting the Great Pyramid’s shaft angles on a map, gives a triangle with the same ratios as the Great Pyramid itself

Here, drawn on the surface of the Earth, is an immense triangle that has exactly the same ratio of dimensions as the Great Pyramid, and this has been drawn using the angles given to us by the shafts inside the Great Pyramid itself. Is this a coincidence? I think not.

Source: Ancient Origins

Message from the Nile

  • History of Czech institution of egyptology

    The Czech egyptology founder is Frantisek Lexa, the author of up to now evaluated work about ancient Egypt magic and Demotic grammar. Seminar for egyptology started thanks to him in Faculty of Philosophy and Arts of Charles University in Prague in 1925. Two years later Lexa became the first regular professor of egyptology in then Czechoslovakia.

  • Abusir - outstation of Czech egyptology expedition

    Abusir is an archaeological locality in Egypt named after nearby recent village Abusir. It is situated on western Nile bank on the edge of Libyan tableland approximately 20 kilometers to the south-west of Cairo. The name of this locality is derived from ancient Egypt god Osiris, from Per Usir (Busiris), "(cult) place of Osiris" (Busiris in Greek).

  • Researches in Western desert

    Czech egyptology is successful in researching not only on pyramidal fields in Abusir recently, but also in supporting and organizing smaller expeditions into egyptian Western desert. Czech expedition has been working even in slowly evanescent oasis El-Hajez since 2003, which is situated about 400 km to the south-west from Cairo.

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